Comprehensive guide to recruitment

A roadmap to appoint most suitable talent while expanding internationally

1 Draft great job descriptions

The challenge

When it comes to expanding your business overseas, hiring is one of the most critical and exciting challenges your company will face. Every new hire affects the team, culture and company direction. It pays to invest time, resources and research into the hiring process. When hiring overseas, the job description is often the first thing a potential hire will see from an organization. Each word in your job posting sends a signal about your company. How do you leave the candidate wanting more, but feeling informed?

Your aim

Ensure your job descriptions clearly describe the scope and responsibilities of the role and simultaneously highlights the mission and purpose of your organization. It should be simple, jargon-free and easily understood by candidates in your international target market(s).

How to go about it?

Regardless of your target market, you should focus your job description content on four categories: area, role, responsibilities and job qualifications. Google's internal and external user studies found that it's best to start high-level (what’s this company all about?) and then get down to the details (what does a person in this role do every day?).

Learn more about writing great job descriptions for your new markets on re:Work with Google

2 Screen for the most promising candidates

The challenge

Resumes are used by most jobseekers all over the world, and resume reviewing is a key focus for hiring managers. It can be difficult to judge a potential candidate by a single sheet of paper, but a resume can help you efficiently compare many applicants to the posted job qualifications that you’re looking for and find the most promising international talent for your market.

Your aim

Use a structured and consistent approach to reviewing resumes in your search for the best international talent for your company.

How to go about it?

There's a lot of room for unconscious bias to color the information. Research tells us that subtle indicators — names, clubs, addresses, school, previous employment, race, parental status, socio-economic status, etc — may unconsciously affect expectations and assessment of a candidate.1 Time pressure may also lead to unconscious bias and affect decision making.

Learn more about screening CVs for the most promising candidates in your new markets on re:Work with Google.

3 Use structured interviews to hire the best resource

The challenge

Hiring a new employee from an international market can be challenging. You are about to conduct a series of interviews with international job seekers, and want to make considered, rational decisions about your choice of candidate. You want to find a way to personally connect with the candidate but don’t want to be swayed by a first impression or a gut feeling.

Your aim

Use structured interviewing to make objective long term hiring decisions for your international market based on consistent, predetermined qualifications.

How to go about it?

Structured interviewing simply means using the same interviewing questions and grading candidate responses on the same scale to assess candidates applying for the same job. Research shows that structured interviews can be predictive of candidate performance, even for jobs that are themselves unstructured.1

Learn more about structured interviewing on re:Work with Google